Special Olympics
Alabama
Mobile County

   

"Let me win. But if I cannot win, let me be brave in the attempt."
 

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Sports That Mobile County Offers

Aquatics 
Because of the wide array of swimming events offered, aquatics is appropriate for a range of ages and ability levels. Aquatics competition events are based on a variety of strokes. Special Olympics also offers events for lower ability level athletes to train and compete in basic aquatics skills. The development of these key skills is necessary prior to advancing to longer competitive events. 

Athletics
Athletics events offer a wide range, from the 100 meters and hurdle events to the marathon, from the high jump to the long jump, shot put, relays and wheelchair events.

In addition, Special Olympics offers events for lower ability level athletes to train and compete in basic athletics skills. The development of these key skills is necessary prior to advancing to longer competitive events.

Bowling
Bowling is one of the fastest growing Special Olympics sports. Although there are some modifications made for athletes with physical disabilities, most athletes compete under the same rules and circumstances as athletes on a professional tour.

In addition to offering traditional singles and doubles events, Special Olympics offers events for athletes with low ability levels to train and compete in basic bowling skills. The development of these key skills is necessary prior to advancing to match play.

Basketball
Basketball is a favorite among Special Olympics athletes. In addition to team competition, Special Olympics Basketball also offers individual skills competition, which allows athletes to train and compete in basic basketball skills. The development of these key skills is necessary prior to advancing to team play. These events include target pass, ten-meter dribble and spot shot. A player's final score is determined by adding the scores together achieved in each of the events.

Bocce
Bocce is a game of skill and strategy. The object is for one team to get as many of their balls (boccia) closer to the pallina (the smallest ball) than the opposing team's closest ball.

There may be anywhere from two to four to eight players on a team. Each player is given two balls. Each player must then take turns rolling (lagging) the ball toward the pallina ball (also known as the jack, cue, beebee etc.), which has already been thrown onto the field. The players are given points for the balls rolled closest to the pallina ball. Players may also throw on the fly (volo), striking the ball to move the point ball. Balls, including the pallina, may also be displaced by the balls of other players.

Bowling
Bowling is one of the fastest growing Special Olympics sports. Although there are some modifications made for athletes with physical disabilities, most athletes compete under the same rules and circumstances as athletes on a professional tour.

In addition to offering traditional singles and doubles events, Special Olympics offers events for athletes with low ability levels to train and compete in basic bowling skills. The development of these key skills is necessary prior to advancing to match play.

Golf
Like most golfers, Special Olympics athletes are driven by the opportunity to compete. Program planning is designed to develop individual golf skills that enhance performance, allowing the athlete to achieve success in playing the game. Both on the practice area and on the course, Special Olympics athletes participating in golf have gained the respect of their golf peers.

Gymnastics
Special Olympics Gymnastics combines strength, flexibility and artistry. Competitions are offered for men in the artistic events and women in artistic and rhythmic events. Male and female gymnasts may compete in all events offered (All Around) or may be specialists, competing in one, two, or more (but not all) events

Powerlifting
Special Olympics Powerlifting is about much more than squats, bench presses and deadlifts. It is about barriers, perseverance and success. Training, determination and attitude determine the fine line between success and failure. The bar may test an athlete's physical abilities, but an internal desire to improve to not settle for less is the drive behind the strain and dedication of the sport. Special Olympics powerlifters are eligible to compete in three lifts: the bench press, the deadlift and the squat, or in combinations.

As in all Special Olympics sports, athletes are grouped in competition divisions according to ability level, age and gender. Note that Special Olympics athletes must be 16 years of age before competing in powerlifting.

Sailing

Speed, strength and smarts are three essential keys to unlocking success in any sport, and Special Olympics sailing is no different. The best sailors develop all three aspects of their racing to their fullest potential.

Snowshoeing
Snowshoeing is very similar to athletics and shares the same excellent cardiovascular workout as cross country skiing. Special Olympics Snowshoeing offers events for athletes of every ability level. Individual events offered in snowshoeing range from the 100 meter races to the 5K. In addition to these traditional events, Special Olympics offers events for lower ability level athletes to train and compete in basic snowshoeing skills. The development of these key skills is necessary prior to advancing to longer competitive events.

Softball
Softball is an exciting team sport in Special Olympics. Athletes play slow-pitch Softball, which involves two teams of 10 athletes each.

Special Olympics offers individual skills competition to allow athletes to train and compete in basic softball skills. The development of these key skills is necessary prior to advancing to team competition. These skills include base running, fielding and throwing. A player's final score is determined by adding together the scores achieved in each of the events.

Please click here if you are interested in receiving more information on any of these sports.

 





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Judy Winfield